Home Lounge Clock (v 1.0)
Post
Cancel

Lounge Clock (v 1.0)

In this post I will cover how I built my lounge clock using ESPHome, Home Assistant, MQTT and a whole lot of other technologies, I think that the end result looks pretty good for my first attempt:

Bill of Material

The following tools \ materials are required should you want to make your own:

  • 3D Printer - or a 3D printing service near you
  • 4x 7-Segment display PCB’s - more information below
  • Piece of wood to mount the clock on
  • ESP8266 - preferably the Wemos D1 Mini
  • Some wires to connect everything together
  • 2 Part Epoxy - I find it works best with PLA
  • Hot glue gun (and glue)
  • DHT11
  • 2x 10K resistors
  • 1x LDR

Custom PCB

Using Easy EDA I was able to come up with the following circuit board:

It’s a pretty simple board that makes use of some WS2812b SMD LEDS wired in the traditional 7-segment pattern:

For fabrication I made use of JLCPCB and their pick and place service, all in 10 boards assembled cost me $27.00 (not too bad!).

I have made the Gerber files available here if you would like to make your own.

3D Printing

There is a LOT of 3D printing required for this project, namely:

The assembly is pretty straight forward (like Lego for adults) and I left enough space to route all the required wires through the risers to give the clock a neater look - although I do not know what happened to mine!

I would put aside ~18 hours for all the printing to be completed (depending on your printing profile).

Assembly

Unfortunately I did not take any pictures of the assembly process, however it is pretty easy.

Each 7-Segment board has a DIN (Digital In) and DOUT (Digital Out) solder point, which need to be daisy chained from one board to another.

On the PCB all the GND points are all connected together, along with the VCC points to make routing power a lot easier. When connecting the boards you just need to follow this pattern if you are using the source code I provide.

1
DIN -> [7-Seg] -> [7-Seg] -> [7-Seg] -> [7-Seg] -> [.] -> [.]

Where the following is true:

  • 7-Seg - represents a 7-Segment PCB
  • [.] - represents a single WS2812x LED

The entire assemby should be mounted onto a backing board (using the stencil to make the appropriate holes), and the additional components should be connected to the ESP8266 similar to the diagram below:

NOTE the single LED represents all the PCBs

1
2
3
D3       WS2812B        Lights
D1       DHT11          Temperature
A0       ADC - LDR      Brightness

Like most DIY projects it may not be pretty, but it works!

FYI: the yellow tape on the spacers are to stop the plastic rubbing on my walls

Source Code

The source code use for my clock is an adaptation of the code found here and I take no credit for the original code, only the modifications to it - thestovedoc deserves the credit!

The modified code can be found here and requires that you either replace the !secret ... placeholders, or inline them into the code before uploading it to the ESP8266.

Segment Values

As mentioned above the 7-Segment PCB’s follow the standard layout (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) to make defining numbers a lot easier.

Below is the number range used in this project as an example:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
int digitsLeds[11][ledsInDigitCount] = {
// A B C D E F G
  {1,1,1,1,1,1,0}, // 0
  {0,1,1,0,0,0,0}, // 1
  {1,1,0,1,1,0,1}, // 2
  {1,1,1,1,0,0,1}, // 3
  {0,1,1,0,0,1,1}, // 4
  {1,0,1,1,0,1,1}, // 5
  {1,0,1,1,1,1,1}, // 6
  {1,1,1,0,0,0,0}, // 7
  {1,1,1,1,1,1,1}, // 8
  {1,1,1,1,0,1,1}, // 9
  {0,0,0,0,0,0,0}, // 10 -> ALL_OFF!
};

Home Assistant Setup

Setting everything up in Home Assistant is pretty simple once you have flashed the firmware to your ESP8266 using the ESPHome:

Card Control

To allow for easier control of the clock I added the following card to my dashboard:

It’s not that pretty, but it gets the job done!

Working left to right:

  • Clock Control - allows for quick control of the clocks brightness
  • H - (hours) short press to toggle, long press to adjust
  • : - (dots) short press to toggle, long press to adjust
  • M - (minutes) short press to toggle, long press to adjust
  • Leading 0 - used to toggle the leading 0 (24 hour \ 12 hour format)
  • Blinking - used to toggle the blinking of the : as it can be annoying when watching TV
  • 12\24 - toggles between 12 and 24 hour time format
  • Clock Mode - quickly enables the clock mode - there are other effects on the clock
  • Lights - group of all the lights making up the lounge clock

The backing code is shown below:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
type: horizontal-stack
cards:
  - type: light
    entity: light.lounge_clock
  - square: true
    columns: 3
    type: grid
    cards:
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: light.lounge_hours_lights
        hold_action:
          action: more-info
        name: HH
        icon: mdi:alpha-h
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: light.lounge_dots_lights
        hold_action:
          action: more-info
        name: ':'
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: light.lounge_minutes_lights
        hold_action:
          action: more-info
        name: MM
        icon: mdi:alpha-m
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: switch.lounge_leading_zero
        name: Zero
        icon: ''
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: switch.lounge_dots_blink
        name: Blink
        icon: mdi:car-light-dimmed
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: toggle
        entity: switch.lounge_24_hour_format
        name: '24'
        icon: mdi:hours-24
        show_state: false
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: call-service
          service: light.turn_on
          service_data:
            effect: Time Effect
          target:
            entity_id: light.lounge_clock
        entity: ''
        icon: mdi:clock-digital
        hold_action:
          action: none
      - show_name: false
        show_icon: true
        type: button
        tap_action:
          action: more-info
        entity: light.lounge_clock_all_lights
        hold_action:
          action: none

Collected Data

In addition to displaying the time, the clock also collects and submits the following data:

  • Brightness - handled by the LDR - measured in voltage (HIGHER = brighter)
  • Humidity - measured by the DHT11
  • Temperature - measured by the DHT11
  • WiFi Signal - built in measure with ESPHome

This data can be used in your home automations, some examples that spring to mind:

  • Use the collected temperature data to control your thermostat
  • Change the brightness of the clock based on ambient lighting
  • Climate control using the Temperature and Humidity values
  • Use the collected WiFi Signal to guage on how a repeater is working in your home
  • etc.

In Closing

This was a fun project to work on, and allowed me to mess around with things like:

  • PCB design and fabrication
  • 3D modeling (using Fusion 360)
  • Coding (C++ lambdas)
  • ESPHome + Home Assistant
  • MQTT (using mosquitto)
  • 3D Printing and fabrication

I found this to be a good starter project for taking my Home Assistant & fabrication to the next level.

As always, please feel free to leave any comments \ suggestions below.

Happy Hacking.

This post is licensed under CC BY 4.0 by the author.

HASS On Unraid: MQTT

HASS On Unraid: ESPHome - Zigbee - Z-Wave

Comments powered by Disqus.